Tuesday, April 1, 2014

REVIVE: RESTORATION FOR RANDOLPH HOUSES

The 19th Century Randolph Houses that line 114th Street between ACP and FDB are now set for restoration after a decade-long wait.  These government own buildings are run by NYCHA which has not been able to maintain them so a private developer has been set to take over 167 units out of the 314 that will be eventually available in about 4 years.  All of the facades will be restored but the interiors will be gut renovated with an addition of elevators.  Rumors abound that these century old homes would eventually become condos but the residential buildings still remain under the affordable and low-income umbrella.  More on Curbed:  LINK

11 comments:

  1. Does anyone know other than the exterior architectural details, do these houses have any other historical significance? For example, who was Randolph?

    114th b/t ACP Blvd & FDB Blvd is the birth place of R & B singer Freddie Jackson. He comes back from time to time to visit. Also, State Sen. BIll Perkins had his campaign office on that street. Its not an "easy" block but for the people that live there its home. Some of the family's on that block go back to the late 1930's.

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  2. well if they continue with this NYCHA nonsense on 114th, it will never be an "easy" block!

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  3. Seriously, and how will the developer make any money if they have to keep the majority of the housing as "projects."

    If they keep it with people who live on all subsidies, the majority of them don't appreciate the property they get for free, and ruin it.

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  4. It is a shady block, I live close by but avoid it at all times.

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  5. this is so annoying on so many different levels...

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  6. Quite frankly Anonymous@10:52 PM you are very wrong. "They" arent' getting anything for free. Subsidize doesn't mean "free." And trust me the developer will make money. The problem is the people like yourself who are always on the side of the developer and his welfare. He isn't concerned about how you make money. And to make such a blanket statement; "...the majority of them don't appreciate the property they get for free, and ruin it." is so unfair, misguided and ignorant.
    The Housing Projects represent neglect on a larger scale than could ever be imposed by those residents who live there. Its benign neglect by "the system" that created them. How exactly do you know that the "majority" will not appreciate it? Thats crazy talk. There are a significant number of working class and working poor and even middle income people living in the projects. They are concerned about the environment they live in but what is one to do when "the system" won't respond to requests & queries? You and those like you need a wake up call in a bad way.
    The

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  7. @anonymous april 2 at 11:49 - I agree with your perspective that blanket statements about "they" are unacceptable and that everyone is entitled to a clean, safe and comfortable environment and appreciates such an environment. So without any prejudicial assumptions, I have a question - that particular block on 114 is known as a more dangerous block than any of those around it. People, longtime Harlem residents especially, are always saying "don't walk on that block." Anyone know why (without making blanket generalizations) that particular block earned such a reputation and feel?

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  8. This is Anonymous April2, 2014 @ 11:49. I will turn 60 years old in May and have lived in Harlem all that time, with a brief stint away at university and some time volunteering & working abroad. I am not privy to such negative associations with West 114th St. b/t ACP & FDB Blvds. Yes, its a bit dicey down there and I think I agreed with that in my inital post when I mentioned that block as not being "easy." I have walked through that block many times and yes, it can be a bit "active." I walked through there all summer long in 2010 when I volunteered on Bill Perkins re-election campaign. But I must tell you that I've known worse blocks in Harlem. I will say again that such blanket statements are hateful, hurtful, derisive & pernicious and do nobody any good, even the persons that espouse & verbalize such thoughts. This is what I dislike about the "new" Harlem and the new comers. We have to constantly be "on guard" for such negative talk and be constantly in a state of defense & correction. But I do realize that nothing I say no matter how tasteful & eloquent will do anything to "correct" or purge people of their longstanding prejudices and ills.

    114th St. b/t ACP & FDB Blvd will get better, of this I am certain.. Its just going to take time and a little more effort and yes, perhaps some new social programs, subsidies, etc. I know thats difficult for some of you to swallow but hey thats the ticket.

    One of the big draw backs of the gentrification in Harlem and elsewhere is that the gentrifiers bring attitudes & a particular social timbre that they should have left in their old neighborhoods. These "newcomers" & thier gentrifying cousins really should have stayed in their old neighborhood since they don't like "...all the churches in Harlem" and the project dwellers who live off the public tit, and all the other elements in Harlem or Bed-Stuy that they don't like.

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  9. Thank you, Anonymous April 3, 2014 at 1:14 PM, for your comments. People need to understand the community into which they are moving and not try to remake it into their own image by erasing the current inhabitants. And certainly they should not view all inhabitants of a street through one lens. Even though the long-time residents may not have the same socio-economic resources as the readers of this site, most have hopes and dreams that they are striving to attain.

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  10. Praise da Lawd!!!!

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