Tuesday, December 3, 2013

☞ DWELL: Number 2: Morningside Park Corridor

Harlem is a large part of Manhattan that changes block by block so we have put together a list of the best micro-nabes in Harlem based on location, architecture, transportation and local amenities. This is our own opinion based on reporting on the neighborhood for a few years and a new post will be made each day until the number one spot has been revealed.

No. 2: The Morningside Park Corridor,  The blocks within the Morningside Avenue and Manhattan Avenue from 110th to 124th Street.  Contrary to what many of the brokers are trying to call it, the lower level of Morningside Park is definitely in South Harlem.  Because of the intact architecture on the blocks especially to the north, this micro nabe feels like the Park Slope of Harlem.  Buildings along Morningside Avenue face Morningside park while the intact, contextually renovated brownstones on the side streets have been consistently commanding record sales closer to $3 million.  This fact along with new record condo sales at One Morningside quickly taking off before the building is even completed have placed the Morningside corridor in the top two positions for best neighborhood.

A couple of years back there were quite a few shells or abandoned buildings in the area but those have nearly all disappeared and the value of the neighborhood is now clearly in view.  The Morningside Park Corridor works well because it is adjacent to the commercial strip on lower FDB and that it is also close to the express subways nearby on 125th Street.  Charm, intact architecture, nearby amenities and express trains along with park views have put this location below 125th Street on the map for 2013.

9 comments:

  1. Some of these brownstone side streets do not have the grandest or largest brownstones in Harlem but in my opinion, with their fabulous iron work, detailed doors and carefully arranges planters, they do have threw most charming homes in all of Harlem. Good choice for number 2, now what could possibly be left for the number one spot?

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  2. Agree these brownstones are not as grand as a few other areas, but the combination of the quiet charm of these blocks, how well maintained they are on many blocks and proximity to FDB amenities, 125th street transport and stores, and Morningside and Central Park this is clearly a great location. However, there is one part of Harlem that rivals Convent Avenue in architecture, is within easy walking distance of FDB and Central Park, and recently has seen some great retail pop up along its central boulevard. Two years ago morningside would have been number 1, but in my opinion there is a clear top spot now. Look forward to tomorrow's post ....

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  3. Mount Morris should be #1

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  4. goodness , if Mount Morris is #1, does Lower Lenox not even make the list?

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  5. @Ay Cee: Lower Lenox? I'm confused why that would make the list? Or were you being sarcastic? If you are indeed serious, I'd be extremely curious to see your list of interesting aspects of 110 to 116 on Lenox. Projects? Tattoo parlor? Liquor stores? Laundromats? More projects? No street life aside from people gathered on the various corners? Do tell!

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  6. When is this going to be made into a coffee table book??

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  7. Depending on one's definition of lower lenox (on this blog 125th street seems to be the cutoff), Mt. Morris includes a good stretch of lower lenox avenue, from 118th street to 124th street from ACP to fifth avenue (although only lenox to fifth is landmarked as of today, the blocks between lenox and ACP are recognized as part of Mt. Morris by the neighborhood association and the national register of historic places, and are architecturally consistent with the landmarked district). As for the stretch farther south, it certainly lacks the original intact late 19th to early 20th century architecture, but it is home to many people, from those in the nycha projects to those in luxury condos on central park north or 116th street. There are certainly worse places to live; we can debate and celebrate harlem's "best" areas without bashing areas that many proudly call home ...

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  8. The anticipation

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