Monday, September 1, 2014

REMEMBER: MARRONE BAKERY IN EAST HARLEM

We were surprised to see that the old Marrone Bakery on 116th Street between First and Second Avenue was still intact on a recent excursion to East Harlem.  This family-owned business opened back in 1956 was one of the last Italian businesses remaining from a time when East Harlem was known as uptown's little Italy.  With most of the core customers moving out of Harlem years ago and folks just started eating a lot of fast food these days, the owners decided to throw in the towel back in 2007.  With  greater Harlem growing in its diversity of incomes and tastes, we now see a chance for a bakery like this to maybe startup up once more. If anyone is looking for an artisan shop setup for a new bakery business, this is the place to be!

Saturday, August 30, 2014

READ: SAVVY BROOKLYNITES MOVE TO HARLEM

The hyper-gentrification of Brooklyn apparently have those under 40 being priced out and moving to New Jersey but some of the more seasoned New Yorkers have discovered Harlem as a recent Times article points out.  These features are quite interesting because a younger generation that has learned to accept Brooklyn as an affordable hub have now been priced of that borough's prime northern neighborhoods but are mostly not savvy enough to look uptown where commutes are much quicker since Harlem is a part of Manhattan.

Harlem does not have a trendy cable series like "Girls" so a certain hip generation is pretty clueless to the fact that an hour commute from Central or East Brooklyn to Manhattan is not really worth it.  Living in Harlem would be just as cost effective but one can get to midtown in less than 15 minutes.  Only one couple in the article who had lived in Caroll Gardens since 2001 discovered that East Harlem made a lot more sense to them when they were looking to buy.  Price were much more affordable, the housing stock looked beautiful and the neighborhood had real character like the Brooklyn they remembered over a decade ago: LINK

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Friday, August 29, 2014

BESPOKE: EARLY COCKTAILS AT RED ROOSTER


We had a couple of friends from Stockholm visiting the city this week who wanted to check out the Red Rooster and had the honor to meet Chef Marcus Samuelsson.  Our tip for those who want to avoid reservations and grab a quick drink or a quick bite is to show up just a little before 5:00PM.  On most days, this time period is when even the busiest restaurant slow down after the lunch hour and start to prepare for dinner service.  There were three stools waiting for us at the distinct bar inside and we tried out the special of the week include the frozen Lenox Lightning and the white peach sangria with St. Germain.

Also at this hour, one can often find Chef Samuelsson working with staff and the local celebrity always welcomes everyone with open arms.  Our guests was a little start struck but nevertheless took the photo opportunity.  Back in Stockholm, Marcus Samuelsson is a big name since the Swedish expat's restaurants are famous all over the world.  Red Rooster is still one of our favorites for so many reason and it is great to be able to drop by casually on a nice summer day and be greeted like an old friend.

DWELL: A HARLEM BROWNSTONE FOR $1 MILLION

Finding a brownstone that is not a total gut renovation for under $1 million these days in Harlem is a rare sight but Number 2289 ACP/7th Avenue might be the right fit for the those entry level buyers at the asking of $999K. The location just below 134th Street is actually a pretty decent block with Shrine and Yatenga being the major attractions. St. Nicholas Park and the express train at 135th and Lenox are also just a block away.   So what are the main issues here?  The first reason that the price is on the lower side is that a rent stabilized tenant has a lease on the top floor of this 2-unit abode which should really be a single-family home.  Since the total width of the townhouse appears to be around 12 feet or even less, there is only half the livable space one typically finds in a Harlem home.  With all that said, those great and decorating small spaces could do wonders with this one: LINK